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The Edible Landscape

Creating a Beautiful and Bountiful Garden with Vegetables, Fruits and Flowers

The Edible Landscape
Print
Author:

Emily Tepe

Format: Flexibound, 160 Pages
ISBN: 9780760341391
Publisher: Voyageur Press
Specs
Illustrations: 161 color photos & 16 drawings
Size: 8.75 x 10.25
Weight: 0.06 lb.
Published: Jan. 19, 2013
List Price: $24.99 $19.99
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As the fresh food revolution sweeps the nation, more and more people are seeking out delicious offerings from local growers. We have had our fill of tasteless, woody tomatoes from the far reaches of the globe and have begun tasting again—thanks to farmers’ markets and co-ops—the real flavors we remember from childhood.
 
Inspired by these events, people have started growing food in the most unlikely places, including rooftops, abandoned parking lots, and tiny balconies and backyards on average city streets. Individuals and families are taking up the trowel and discovering that gardening can be fun, fulfilling, and, ultimately, delicious. Far from sacrificing their ornamental flowers, creative gardeners can discover the joy of growing food in beautiful, thoughtful gardens overflowing with both color and flavor.
 
Creating an attractive and productive garden in your small space might seem impossible, but throughout this book, you’ll see examples of some wonderful things that can be done, from interesting plant combinations to unique structures and planting beds. If you can banish the thought that vegetables and fruits must be grown in rows and open up to the idea that a tomato plant can be a striking addition to your landscape plan, The Edible Landscape will help you explore some ideas for transforming your yard into a feast for both the eyes and the table.

 

As a fruit researcher and a former exhibit designer and muralist, Emily Tepe looks at the world with both a practical and creative eye. Her appreciation for plants, design, good food, and the outdoors inspired her to bring these all together in The Edible Landscape. In 2009, she established an edible landscape demonstration garden at the University of Minnesota, which now gives students the opportunity to try their hand at this style of garden design. In addition, Emily writes about fresh garden ideas and fresh food on her blog, www.artichokesandzinnias.com
"Tepe, a fruit researcher and artis, combines here talents to help readers create gardens that are both attractive and practical. She notes the mutual benefits of edible and ornamental plants: The edibles add color, texture and form to a landscape, while the ornamentals attract beneficial insects, provide winter interest and supply the plant diversity that helps keep insects and diseases in check." - Mary Beth Breckenridge, Akron Beacon Journal
"Even if all you've got is a tiny apartment balcony, you can still grow a feast. So says artist and fruit researcher Emily Tepe in her new book, 'The Edible Landscape: Creating a Beautiful and Bountiful Garden with Vegetables, Fruits and Flowers.' The book is filled with lots of creative ideas, from interesting plant combinations for added texture to unique structures for sculptural interest. And who says food needs to be grown in straight rows? Not this book." - Sandra Barrera, Los Angeles Daily News
"When reading the book I really had a sense that Emily Tepe understands natural balance, ethical gardening and aesthetics. It's a very holistically minded gardening book." - Adele, The Garden Coach, Winnipeg
www.gardencoach.blogspot.ca
"If you think you don't have room for growing edibles, The Edible Landscape will show you how to incorporate them into your yard. They in turn will feed you well while injecting some pizzazz into your garden design." - Susan Mulvihill, Susans In The Garden Blog
www.susansinthegarden.blogspot.com

"Author Emily Tepe doesn't accept the old notion that food-producing plants should be segregated in their own plot. She advocates combining them freely with ornamentals to add color, texture and visual interest to beds and containers. "I believe a yard can be both beautiful and productive," she writes." - Minneapolis Star-Tribune

"Lush with photographs of expertly landscaped small cottage gardens, (the) book is inspiring as well as useful." - Experience Life

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Preface
Introduction: The garden is returning home
Chapter 1: How to approach your edible landscape
Chapter 2: Success is in the details
Chapter 3: Creating the edible landscape
Chapter 4: Season of plenty
Chapter 5: Change of seasons
Chapter 6: Favorite plants for the edible landscape
Appendix: Selected plants for northern landscapes
Resources
Index

News

February 6,2013
Author Emily Tepe doesn’t accept the old notion that food-producing plants should be segregated in their own plot. She advocates combining them freely with ornamentals to add color, texture and visual interest to beds and containers. “I believe a yard can be both beautiful and productive,” she writes. Learn More.
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